Glute Bridge Knee Drives (How To, Muscles Worked, Benefits)


Glute Bridge Knee Drives

Glute Bridge Knee Drives are a slightly more advanced variation of the more common Glute Bridge. I personally like them because they combine a dynamic movement together with a static hold position. The combination of the two really makes the glutes fire and work.

They’re great as a warm-up movement for squat and run days or as a finisher at the end of a workout, usually included in a core circuit.

It’s an extremely versatile movement because they’re relatively easy to learn and requires zero equipment to perform.

In this guide, I’m going to teach you how to do Glute Bridge Knee Drives, show you what muscles they work (spoiler alert: glutes) and give you a couple alternatives in case you need them.


How To Do Glute Bridge Knee Drives


Equipment Needed

  • None

Step-by-Step Instructions

  • Start by laying on your back on the ground.
  • Bend both knees to about a 90 degree angle and place both feet flat on the floor.
  • Now, drive through the heels and extend the hips up.
  • You should be able to draw a straight line from the shoulders, through the hips and knees.
  • From this position, raise the right leg up (keeping the same angle in the knee) until the foot is about even with the opposite knee.
  • Finally, lower the right foot back down to the starting position and drive up the opposite leg.
  • Continue this ‘marching’ action back and forth until all reps are completed.

Coaching Points

As you raise the hips up, try to drive the knee slightly forward (the leg with the foot on the ground). This can help with getting a strong glute contraction and a full extension of the hips.

Because of the marching action involved with this exercise, they can sometimes be referred to as Glute Bridge Marches. If you see that listed on a workout, it’s most likely referring to the same movement.


Glute Bridge Knee Drives Benefits


Glute Bridge Knee Drives are a great glute activator and an excellent lower body warm-up exercise. Unfortunately, many athletes (and non-athletes) don’t fire their glutes as they should during big compound movements. By utilizing a couple activation movements, one can ‘wake up’ these muscles and get them prepared to work.

For these reasons I like to incorporate Glute Bridge Knee Drives on squat days, Olympic lift days as well as running days.


Muscles Worked


Gluteus Maximus
Glute Bridge Knee Drives target the Gluteus Maximus (shown) as well as the Gluteus Medius located just above and on the outer edge of the Gluteus Maximus.

As you might expect, given the name, Glute Bridge Knee Drives heavily emphasize the glutes.


Glute Bridge Knee Drive Variations


If you’re struggling with Glute Bridge Knee Drives, here are a couple variations you can try that are a little easier to start with. You can always progress back to Glute Bridge Knee Drives when you feel you’re ready.

Glute Bridges

Glute Bridge

The easiest modification to make with Glute Bridge Knee Drives is to leave both feet on the floor and perform ‘regular’ Glute Bridges. By being able to drive off of both feet instead of just one it makes the movement easier to do.

Glute Bridges too easy, but Knee Drives are still too challenging. Give SL Glute Bridges a try. They’re the next progression as you continue working towards more difficult variations.

Bird Dogs

Bird Dogs

If you’re still struggling to get good hip extension, even with regular Glute Bridges, try switching things up a bit and give Bird Dogs a try instead.

Bird Dogs are another great glute activation movement, but they are done by starting prone on all fours (hands and knees). Lift and extend the right arm and left leg, squeeze the glutes, and then return to the starting position. Repeat for the opposite side.


More Links and Info


Looking for more great warm-up movements like this one? Make sure to check out my Warm-up Section of my Exercise Library. There you’ll find more step-by-step instructions on other great mobility drills and glute activators – all for free.

Ryan Horton

Horton Barbell was created by Ryan Horton who has served as a Sports Performance Coach for almost 20 years. My mission is to create a training resource to help as many coaches and athletes as possible maximize athletic potential.

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