Reverse Crunch (How To, Muscles Worked, Benefits)


Reverse Crunch is an excellent core exercise that really focuses and emphasizes the lower abdominal region.

In this guide, I’m going to teach you how to do Reverse Crunches including important coaching points and a few alternative exercises as well.


How To Do Reverse Crunches


Equipment Needed

  • None

Muscles Worked

  • Abdominals (Rectus Abdominis, Obliquus Externus Abdominis)
  • Hip Flexors (Iliopsoas, Rectus Femoris, Tensor Fasciae Latae)

How To

  • Start laying on your back with hands either out to the side or under the low back for support.
  • Lift the legs up six inches off the ground.
  • Pull the knees in toward the core.
  • Now, extend the legs and drive the feet straight up in the air – lifting the hips up off the ground.
  • Retrace back to the starting position (keep feet off the ground) and repeat.

Coaching Points

Focus on using the core to really lift the hips off the ground and drive the legs into the air at the top. Then, move more slowly and under control back to the start.

How Many Reps?

I like to include Reverse Crunches as part of a larger core circuit, combined with 2 or 3 other core exercises. 1 to 2 sets of 15 to 20.


Reverse Crunch Alternatives


Need an alternative exercise for Reverse Crunches? Here are a couple of suggestions that you may be able to use as a replacement.

Want more options? Here are 14 of my favorite alternatives for Reverse Crunches.

Dead Bugs

Dead Bugs are a similar core movement to Reverse Crunches, only less dynamic and with more of a focus on stabilization.

Hanging Knee Raises

Hanging Knee Raises is another core exercise that puts a heavy emphasis on the lower abdominals. It also has the added benefit of improving grip strength and shoulder stability.

If you’re ready for a bit more of a challenge than Reverse Crunches, Hanging Knee Raises is a great option.


More Links and Info


If you’d like to see more core movements, make sure to check out the Core Section of our Exercise Library. There you’ll find dozens of core exercises, all with complete step-by-step instructions.

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Ryan Horton

Horton Barbell was created by Ryan Horton who has served as a Sports Performance Coach for almost 20 years. My mission is to create a training resource to help as many coaches and athletes as possible maximize athletic potential.

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